Wood Sorrel, a tangy tasty treat you must try

sorrel

sorrel

This beautiful gem is called wood sorrel. These are NOT clovers. Take a closer look. Each "leaf" is heart shaped. They are very distinct compared to clovers and that'll really hit home once you taste them. Go ahead, try them. Don't be scared. Wander outside and you are bound to find these tucked somewhere in your yard. Maybe it's alongside your garage or out by the shed? I'll wait while you venture. Maybe try looking for them barefoot. I hear that helps.

There are no toxic look a-likes. It is hard to misidentify. You will NOT suddenly go into convulsions and die a painful slow death if you put this in your mouth.

These are tangy, lemony, tart, sweet and oh so tasty. If I ever take someone out into the woods and they are hesitant about eating anything, I have them try this first. Every time, their reaction has been the same, "Oh! This isn't that bad... Can I have more?" Everyone usually opens up about eating wild plants after they try this delicious ice breaker. I think everyone assumes that wild food will taste like clovers (BORING).

I crave it in the winter and can't wait for it to pop out in the spring. I used to have chronic canker sores that were incredibly painful and debilitating. They disappeared once I started eating wood sorrel. Crazy, right?!

Not really.

We used to eat vitamins and minerals back in the day. And by back in the day, I mean 1000 years ago. Now we are so used to simple carbs and sugars. I like to try and eat as many wild things as possible every day and I notice that I crave them more and more. My body will tell me what to eat and when to stop. You CAN eat too much Oxalis (the latin or scientific name for wood sorrel), but my body says, "Hey man, you shouldn't eat anymore, I don't want that in here". It's interesting to eat with my whole body, instead of just my taste buds.

Wood sorrel is good for mouth ulcers, has vitamin C and is a thirst quencher. It has cooling properties, calcium and B complex vitamins. It relieves indigestion, can help stop vomiting an stimulate the apatite. It is a diuretic, astringent and has been used by cancer patients. This is an understudied plant too so who knows what else is in there. It's great is soups, stews, sandwiches, and just plain.

All I know is that I love eating it, my body craves it and so does my tongue.

If you only try one wild edible, let it be wood sorrel!

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creeping-wood-sorrel-oxalis-corniculata-01

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wfshl-creepingwoodsorrel-07

woodsorrel

woodsorrel